Buddhist Movie Night at PIMC: "The Matrix" (Sat., 6/15/19, 6:30pm)

Please join us for another edition of Buddhist Movie Night at Portland Insight Meditation Community (PIMC). We'll be watching "The Matrix" on Saturday, June 15, 2019.  The screening will begin at 6:30pm.

This is a chance to come together as a community, enjoy Buddhist/mindfulness-themed cinema, and discuss how the material relates to our understanding of the Buddha and the Dharma.

Mikki and Chanel will be hosting the movie night and leading the discussion afterward. It will be a very mellow, low key affair. Please come, bring a snack to share if you like, and enjoy.

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DATE/TIME: Saturday, June 15, 2019  /  6:30-9:00PM

LOCATION: PIMC, 6536 SE Duke St., Portland

SUGGESTED DONATION: $5/person (no one turned away for insufficient funds).

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The Matrix is a 1999 science fiction action film[3][4] written and directed by the Wachowskis[a] that stars Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss, Hugo Weaving, and Joe Pantoliano. It depicts a dystopian future in which humanity is unknowingly trapped inside a simulated reality, the Matrix, created by thought-capable machines (artificial beings)[b] to distract humans while using their bodies as an energy source.[5] When computer programmer Thomas Anderson, under the hacker alias "Neo", uncovers this truth, he "is drawn into a rebellion against the machines"[5] along with other people who have been freed from the Matrix.

The Matrix is an example of the cyberpunk subgenre of science fiction.[6] The Wachowskis' approach to action scenes was influenced by Japanese animation[7] and martial arts films, and the film's use of fight choreographers and wire fu techniques from Hong Kong action cinema influenced subsequent Hollywood action film productions. The film is known for popularizing a visual effect known as "bullet time", where the heightened perception of certain characters is represented by allowing the action within a shot to progress in slow-motion while the camera appears to move through the scene at normal speed, allowing the sped-up movements of certain characters to be perceived normally. While some critics have praised the film for its handling of difficult subjects, others have said the deeper themes are largely overshadowed by its action scenes.[8]

The Matrix was first released in the United States on March 31, 1999, and grossed over $460 million worldwide. It was well-received by many critics[9][10] and won four Academy Awards, as well as other accolades, including BAFTA Awards and Saturn Awards. The Matrix was praised for its innovative visual effects, cinematography and entertainment value. The film has since appeared in lists of the greatest science fiction films,[8][11][12] and was added to the National Film Registry for preservation in 2012.[13] The success of the film led to the release of two feature film sequels in 2003, The Matrix Reloaded and The Matrix Revolutions, which were also written and directed by the Wachowskis. The Matrix franchise was further expanded, with the Wachowskis being heavily involved, through the production of comic books, video games and animated short films. The Matrix franchise has even inspired books and theories on some of the religious and philosophical ideas alluded to in the movies.

 
According to CommonSense Media, this film is appropriate for teenagers 14+. "Parents need to know that although The Matrix is an exciting, sometimes confusing, sci-fi adventure with a brooding Keanu Reeves and a mysterious Laurence Fishburne at it center. It's heavy on special effects and rated R for violence (some pretty gross, including an icky bug that enters the hero's body through his belly button) and language ("s--t," "goddamn," "crap," etc.). Most teens 14 and up who are begging to see it should be able to handle it without a problem, though the plot can be confusing as it unfolds."

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Also be sure to join us for our other monthly Buddhist movie nights. Here's the schedule for 2019 (scheduled for the 3rd Saturday of the month):

July 20:   Brother Sun, Sister Moon (1972 directed by: Franco Zefarelli)
Aug. 17:  Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter . . . and Spring (2003 directed by: Kim Ki-Duk)
Sept. 21:  American Beauty (1999 directed by: Sam Mendes)
Oct. 19:    Kung Fu Panda (2008 directed by: Mark Osborne & John Stevenson)
Nov. 16:   A Man Escaped (1956 directed by Robert Bresson)
Dec. 21:   Late Spring (1949 directed by: Yasujiro Ozu)