Robert Talk - Part 2: The Pale Blue Dot: Who We Really Are

Description: 
NOTE: DUE TO TECHNICAL PROBLEMS, THIS DHARMA GATHERING WAS SPLIT INTO TWO SEPARATE VIDEOS. THIS PART HAS THE THE QI GONG MOVEMENT PRACTICE, ANNOUNCEMENTS, AND THE DHARMA TALK. PLEASE SEE PART 1 FOR THE GUIDED MEDITATION. 

THE DHARMA TALK BEGINS AT TIME STAMP 00:26:20, PRECEDED BY: A QI GONG MOVEMENT PRACTICE (LEAD BY JIM AT THE BEGINNING OF THE VIDEO) AND ANNOUNCEMENTS.

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Below are some literary references and nuggets of wisdom from Robert's talk:

 

The Dakini Speaks

(By Jennifer Welwood)

My friends, let’s grow up.
Let’s stop pretending we don’t know the deal here.
Or if we truly haven’t noticed, let’s wake up and notice.
Look: Everything that can be lost, will be lost.
It’s simple — how could we have missed it for so long?
Let’s grieve our losses fully, like ripe human beings,
But please, let’s not be so shocked by them.
Let’s not act so betrayed,
As though life had broken her secret promise to us.
Impermanence is life’s only promise to us,
And she keeps it with ruthless impeccability.
To a child she seems cruel, but she is only wild,
And her compassion exquisitely precise:
Brilliantly penetrating, luminous with truth,
She strips away the unreal to show us the real.
This is the true ride — let’s give ourselves to it!
Let’s stop making deals for a safe passage:
There isn’t one anyway, and the cost is too high.
We are not children anymore.
The true human adult gives everything for what cannot be lost.
Let’s dance the wild dance of no hope!

 

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Excerpt from the book, "The Pale Blue Dot", by Carl Sagan

Look again at that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every "superstar," every "supreme leader," every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there--on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known.

-- Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot, 1994

http://www.planetary.org/explore/space-topics/earth/pale-blue-dot.html

 

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Book Recommendation by Robert:

 

"Lady of the Lotus", by William Edmund Barrett

 

(The story of the The Buddha told from the point of view of his wife.)

Date: 
Sunday, December 16, 2018