So, Why Meditate?

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NOTE: THE DHARMA TALK BEGINS AT TIME STAMP 01:09:50.

THE DHARMA TALK IS PRECEDED BY: GUIDED GROUP MEDITATION, A MOVEMENT PRACTICE (LEAD BY ROBERT) AT TIME STAMP 00:54:40, AND ANNOUNCEMENTS.

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THE FOLLOWING ARE REFERENCES THAT ROBERT SHARED DURING HIS DHARMA TALK, SO YOU CAN CHECK THEM OUT, IF YOU CHOOSE ..............

 

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"All the world's a stage,

And all the men and women merely players;

They have their exits and their entrances,

And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice,
In fair round belly with good capon lined,
With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern instances;
And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slippered pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;
His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank, and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything."
 
              - William Shakespeare, from the comedy, "As You Like It" -
 
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The "WeCroak" smartphone app.
 

"The WeCroak app is inspired by a Bhutanese folk saying: to be a happy person, one must contemplate death five times daily.

"Each day, we’ll send you five invitations to stop and think about death. Our invitations come at random times and at any moment, just like death. When they come, you can open the app to reveal a quote about death from a poet, philosopher, or notable thinker.

"We encourage you to take one moment for contemplation, conscious breathing or meditation. We believe that a regular practice of contemplating mortality helps us accept what we must, let go of things that don’t matter and honor the things that do."

FOR MORE INFO: https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2018/01/when-death-pings/54...

 

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“I Am Not I”

Translated by Robert Bly
 
 
"I am not I.
                   I am this one
walking beside me whom I do not see,
whom at times I manage to visit,
and whom at other times I forget;
who remains calm and silent while I talk,
and forgives, gently, when I hate,
who walks where I am not,

who will remain standing when I die."

 
(Juan Ramón Jiménez, “‘I Am Not I’” from Lorca and Jiménez: Selected Poems. Translation copyright © 1973 by Robert Bly. Reprinted with the permission of Beacon Press.
Source: Lorca and Jimenez: Selected Poems (Beacon Press, 1973))
 

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"The personality does its dance in the light of consciousness"
 
- Robert Beatty -
 

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(Robert retold, in paraphrased form, the story of the Buddha and The Angry Man. The following is a more scholarly rendition of that story, as translated from the Buddhist text)
 
 

The Reviler

Once while the Blessed One stayed near Rajagaha in the Veluvana Monastery at the Squirrels' Feeding Place, there lived at Rajagha a Brahman of the Bharadvaja clan who was later called "the Reviler." When he learned that one of his clan had gone forth from home life and had become a monk under the recluse Gotama, he was angry and displeased. And in that mood he went to see the Blessed One, and having arrived he reviled and abused him in rude and harsh speech.

Thus being spoken to, the Blessed One said: "How is it, Brahman: do you sometimes receive visits from friends, relatives or other guests?"

"Yes, Master Gotama, I sometimes have visitors."

"When they come, do you offer to them various kinds of foods and a place for resting?"

"Yes, I sometimes do so."

"But if, Brahman, your visitors do not accept what you offer, to whom does it then belong?"

"Well, Master Gotama, if they do not accept it, these things remain with us."

"It is just so in this case, Brahman: you revile us who do not revile in return, you scold us who do not scold in return, you abuse us who do not abuse in return. So we do not accept it from you and hence it remains with you, it belongs to you, Brahman..."

[The Buddha finally said:]

"Whence should wrath rise for him who void of wrath,
Holds on the even tenor of his way,
Self-tamed, serene, by highest insight free?

"Worse of the two is he who, when reviled,
Reviles again. Who doth not when reviled,
Revile again, a two-fold victory wins.
Both of the other and himself he seeks
The good; for he the other's angry mood
Doth understand and groweth calm and still.
He who of both is a physician, since
Himself he healeth and the other too —
Folk deem him a fool, they knowing not the Norm."[1]

— Abridged and freely rendered from Samyutta Nikaya, Brahmana Samyutta, No. 2. Verses translated by C. A. F. Rhys Davids, in "Kindred Sayings," vol. I.

 
 

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(The following are two thoughtful comments by questioners at the end of the Dharma Talk)
 
1. "Where is the line between acceptance and apathy"?
 
2. "When you hear a car honking, that is the sound of suffering, and you should feel compassion."
 
 
 
Date: 
Sunday, September 2, 2018